Webinars

Towards Increasingly Autonomous Aircraft-enabled Mobility

Event Info

icon_calendar.jpgJune 11, 2021
icon_clock.jpg9 am ET
icon_stopwatch.jpgDuration: 1 hour

Speaker

jp

John-Paul Clarke is a professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at The University of Texas at Austin, where he holds the Ernest Cockrell Jr. Memorial Chair in Engineering. Previously, he was a faculty member at Georgia Tech and MIT, Vice President of Strategic Technologies at United Technologies Corporation (now Raytheon), and a researcher at Boeing and NASA JPL. He has also co-founded multiple companies, most recently Universal Hydrogen – a company dedicated to the development of a comprehensive carbon-free solution for aviation. Clarke is a leading expert in aircraft trajectory prediction and optimization, especially as it pertains to reducing the environmental impact of aviation, and in the development and use of stochastic models and optimization algorithms to improve the efficiency and robustness of aircraft, airline, airport, and air traffic operations. He is the founding chair of the AIAA Human-Machine Teaming Technical Committee, and was co-chair of the National Academies Committee that developed the US National Agenda for Autonomy Research related to Civil Aviation. Clarke received S.B. (1991), S.M. (1992), and Sc.D. (1997) degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. He is a Fellow of the AIAA and the RAeS, and is a member of AGIFORS, INFORMS, and Sigma Xi.

The national vision for advanced aerial mobility is an airspace system that can support high-scale flight operations supporting any number of applications, using vehicles small and large, carrying passengers or cargo, and operating over cities or in remote areas. This vision will require greater aircraft and air traffic management (ATM) system autonomy; a synergistic relationship between vertiport locations and flight trajectories to address noise, privacy, and safety concerns; and new certification standards for vehicles, systems, and operators. To this end, I will discuss how the first two challenges may be addressed via simulation and optimization, and present prior and ongoing work on frameworks, algorithms, and policies for autonomous decision-making during approach and landing; highly automated multi-aircraft conflict resolution; and trajectory planning to maximize the mission efficiency, success and survivability of autonomous flight vehicles. I will also propose a framework for the certification of vehicles that must both operate and make decisions autonomously.


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Constructing a Resilient Global Port Network Toward Secure Global Supply Chains

Event Info

icon_calendar.jpgMay 7, 2021
icon_clock.jpg12 pm ET
icon_stopwatch.jpgDuration: 1 hour

Speaker

Elise

Elise Miller-Hooks
Professor & Hazel Chair in Infrastructure Engineering
George Mason University

Dr. Elise Miller-Hooks holds the Bill and Eleanor Hazel Endowed Chair in Infrastructure Engineering at George Mason University. Prior to this appointment, she served as a program director at the U.S. National Science Foundation and was a member of the faculties of the University of Maryland, Pennsylvania State University and Duke University. Dr. Miller-Hooks received her Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Texas – Austin and B.S. in Civil Engineering from Lafayette College. She is an advisor to the World Bank Group and founding Editor-in-Chief of the new IFORS/Elsevier journal: Sustainability Analytics and Modeling. Her research focuses in: mathematical modeling and optimization for transportation systems; multi-hazard civil infrastructure resilience quantification; emergency/disaster planning and response; intermodal passenger and freight transport; real-time routing and fleet management; paratransit, ridesharing and bikeways; stochastic and dynamic network algorithms; and collaborative and multi-objective decision-making.

Ports are critical components of the global supply chain, providing key connections between land- and maritime-based transport modes. They operate in cooperative, but competitive, co-opetitive, environments wherein the throughput of individual ports is linked through an underlying transshipment network. The ports, as well as supporting rail and roadway system infrastructures, however, are by the nature of their designs and locations inherently vulnerable to rising sea levels, significant precipitation events, storm surges and consequent coastal flooding. They are increasingly automated and, thus, greatly reliant on power and communications technologies. They are also subject to other disruptive events of natural or anthropogenic causes. Investments, thus, are needed to protect this intermodal (IM) system from such disruptive forces, and protective actions are required for business continuity during and immediately following a disruption. This presentation proposes optimization, equilibrium and digital twinning techniques for developing multi-stakeholder, protective investment, and response strategies aimed at enhancing resilience of this marine-based IM system to disruption and securing our global supply chains.


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A Branch-Price-and-Cut Algorithm for a Two-Echelon Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

Event Info

icon_calendar.jpgApril 16, 2021
icon_clock.jpg10:00 am ET
icon_stopwatch.jpgDuration: 1 hour  

Speaker

Guy

Guy Desaulniers received his PhD in mathematics from Polytechnique Montreal, where he is a professor in the department of Mathematics and Industrial Engineering. Between 2015 and 2019, he was the director of the GERAD research center. He has supervised more than 65 graduate students, co-authored more than 110 papers published in academic journals, and co-edited a book on column generation. His main research interests are in the areas of large-scale optimization (in particular, column generation), integer programming, combinatorial optimization, and constrained shortest path problems with applications to vehicle routing and crew scheduling in ground, air, rail, and maritime transportation.

In this talk, we consider the two-echelon vehicle routing problem with time windows (2E-VRPTW). This problem arises in city logistics when high-capacity and low-capacity vehicles are used to transport merchandise from depots to satellites (first echelon), and from satellites to customers (second echelon), respectively. The aim is to determine a set of least-cost first- and second-echelon routes such that the load on the routes respect the capacity of the vehicles, each second-echelon route is supplied by exactly one first-echelon route, and each customer is visited by exactly one second-echelon route within its time window. We model this 2E-VRPTW with a route-based formulation involving first-echelon and second-echelon route variables. We propose to solve it using a branch-price-and-cut algorithm where only the second-echelon routes are generated by column generation. We discuss some specialized components of this algorithm, namely, the labeling algorithm for solving the pricing problems as well as deep dual optimal inequalities that are added to reduce degeneracy. We report computational results that show that our BPC algorithm outperforms a state-of-the-art algorithm. We also present sensitivity analysis results on the different components of our algorithm, and derive managerial insights related to the structure of the first-echelon routes.

Guy Desaulniers, Polytechnique Montreal and GERAD, Canada

Co-authors: Tayeb Mhamedi, Marilène Cherkesly, Henrik Andersson

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Cobotic Order Picking Systems

Event Info

icon_calendar.jpgMarch 12, 2021
icon_clock.jpg10:00 am ET
icon_stopwatch.jpgDuration: 1 hour  

Speaker

rene

René (M.) B.M. de Koster is a professor of Logistics and Operations Management at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, and chairs the department Technology and Operations Management. He holds a PhD from Eindhoven University of Technology. He is the 2018 honorary Francqui Professor at Hasselt University. His research interests are warehousing, material handling, and behavioral operations. He is the founder of the Material Handling Forum and is author / editor of 8 books and over 240 papers in books and academic journals. He is associate editor of Transportation Science, Service Science, and Operations Research.

The new generation of warehouses will be fully robotized. However, in the nearby future, robots will gradually find their way into the operations and will have to work in close collaboration with manual workers. In my talk, I will discuss two types of cobotic order picking systems, where robots and order pickers work together to fill customer orders: drive-on cobots and walk-along cobots. I will discuss empirical, experiment-based work on the impact on pick performance of robots leading versus robots following the pickers, and analytical modelling research on control strategies and collaboration strategies. Our results show that, with proper deployment, cobots may lead to a substantial increase in picking performance.

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Traffic Management and Control in Fully Automated Vehicle Environment

Event Info

icon_calendar.jpgFebruary 12, 2021
icon_clock.jpg9:30am EST
icon_stopwatch.jpgDuration: 1 hour (plus networking)

Speaker

chang.jpg
Dr. Yafeng Yin is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He works in the area of transportation systems analysis and modeling, and has published more than 120 refereed papers in leading academic journals. His current research focuses on connected and automated mobility systems.

In this talk, we present rhythmic traffic control, a new paradigm of controlling vehicles to traverse a traffic facility such as a signal-free intersection and a traffic network, in a fully automated vehicle (AV) environment. The fundamental idea of rhythmic control is to determine an underlying beat for the traffic facility and then require AVs to follow the beat and a design speed to enter and traverse the facility; the start of the beat for each conflicting movement is carefully synchronized so that vehicles will pass through a conflict point in an alternating and collision-free manner without any stop. We show that this new control paradigm is simple, but yields superior performance compared with previous paradigms or proposals, and is computationally tractable and thus scalable.

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On-Demand Multimodal Transit Systems: Capturing Travel Mode Adoption and Assessing Resilience

Event Info

icon_calendar.jpgJanuary 15, 2021
icon_clock.jpg9am EST
icon_stopwatch.jpgDuration: 1 hour

Speaker

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Dr. Pascal Van Hentenryck
H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology

Pascal Van Hentenryck is an A. Russell Chandler III Chair and Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech. Van Hentenryck’s research focuses in Artificial Intelligence, Data Science, and Operations Research. His current focus is to develop methodologies, algorithms, and systems for addressing challenging problems in mobility, energy systems, resilience, and privacy.